Jellycat Bashful Baby Shower Cookies

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One of my favorite things about baby shower cookies is that it doesn’t matter what the theme is, you know it will be cute as hell.  I hadn’t heard of Bashful before a friend asked me to make cookies for a baby shower she’s hosting, Bashful-themed.

I used a scalloped 3’ x 3” cutter, baked 12 cookies and got to work on how to execute the design.

Unlike many cookie decorators, I don’t have the KopyKate Projector yet, so with each project my approach varies.  For this design, I found an image online and snapped a photo with my iphone that I’ll trace directly from my phone. Because I want my image to be scaled to the cookie cutter size, I trace the cookie cutter on a square of paper and place the paper over my cell phone with the image open, with the phone on brightest setting so the image shines through the paper. Holding the paper in one place, I then trace the image (which if you’ve never done this before, your phone acts like a lightbox and makes it really easy to trace). I then cut out the image so I can lay it on the cookie to trace with a Sweet Sugar Belle Marker, like the one you see in the picture. I actually cut each of the ears off in order to best trace where the head and ear connect. This process is really your own to do how you please, it’s all trial and error, so just go for it.  You can’t help but learn how to do it better with each design. Once all 12 cookies were traced and ready for icing, I made a full batch of icing and separated out enough to make thick black and thick white icing for outlining and black and white 10 second icing to fill in each outlined section. Here’s a link to blogpost with photos of different royal icing consistencies, compliments of The Bearfoot Baker Royal Icing Consistency

 

To start, I iced the background with white icing (of which I added a little bit of color flow mix, to give it a different look from the dog icing and also to prevent bleeding). One by one all 12 cookie backgrounds were iced and went straight into the dehydrator, with the door open.  I leave the door open for at least an hour because my dehydrator lowest setting is 105 degrees.  95 degrees would be best, but leaving the door off works too.

Now, the time consuming part, filling in each section and waiting for it to dry enough before moving on to the section next to the dried icing. Unfortunately, because this batch got started late (due to the last minute henna order) I only had a weekend to dedicate to these, which meant each weekday evening was spent doing little bits of the dog, letting it dry, then returning to it the next night.  Definitely not a preferred method for many reasons, but that was the only option to get them boxed and delivered on time.  For this reason I don’t have many pictures of each icing steps, as I was laser-focused on merely getting them done on time.  Ever had a last minute order that required lots of steps and dry time? I’d love to hear your tricks to cutting out a step or two!

Once the dog was fully iced, I used an xacto knife to etch the stuffed animal stitching, then used a paintbrush (used for cookies only) to texturize the fur. This can also be time consuming because you have to take care to not get the black on the white icing and vice versa. (in hindsight, maybe I should’ve done all the white sections first, texture and all, then the black. Food for thought).  Once all done, the final touch is to add some sparkle with Disco Dust. To apply, I use a small salt well of gin or vodka, as the vehicle for the dust to adhere to (any clear alcohol works or even clear extract. Just take care that you don’t use a brown extract on white icing). Apply a light coat of alcohol on the areas of the cookie you want dusted, then using a food safe brush (the large kind that looks like a blush brush) to dust each cookie.  Then the cookies go back in the dehydrator for final drying time of at least 30 minutes, then they’re ready for boxing.